ESSEC Knowledge Review: The future of work

ESSEC Knowledge Review: The future of work

The special issue is available here. For a mobile or tablet-friendly version, click here.

Over the last two years, we’ve drastically changed the way we work. We’ve gotten used to working from home, to attending meetings virtually, to doing laundry or going for a run during the day: habits we are unwilling to relinquish as the office opens back up. While working remotely has become the norm, staying connected with remote colleagues remains a challenge. We also increasingly want more from our work than a paycheck - we’re searching for autonomy and for a sense of meaning from what we do. It’s not only our working habits that have changed - the  world is going through a social and environmental transition, and the jobs of tomorrow need to address emerging challenges. 

The past few years have demonstrated just how quickly individuals, companies, and societies can adapt to new ways of working. This adaptability is a critical skill for our changing world. As the COVID-19 pandemic subsides, we're all wondering: what's next for the world of work? 

At ESSEC, we do more than wonder what the future holds - our professors conduct cutting-edge research on topics pertaining to the world of work. In this issue of the ESSEC Knowledge Review, professors working in the fields of management, public policy, information sciences, and economics share their research and insights. Their work touches on a wide variety of topics, ranging from how to stay connected with colleagues when working remotely, the future of green jobs, bossless organizations, women in the workplace, meaningful work, customizing your career, and more. These expert analyses cover various aspects of the future of work, from jobs of the future, to the employee experience, to organizational design

The world might be in flux, but we know one thing for sure: there’s no going back to business as usual. It’s time to “Enlighten. Lead. Change.” and imagine the future of work together. 

Julia Smith, Editor-in-Chief of ESSEC Knowledge

essec knowledge on twitter

blog comments powered by Disqus

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA